Fact check

Conflicts, complaints and curiosities – on a myriad of topics, you will find contradictory explanations on the internet. So, what is actually true? For individual users, this is often hard to determine, especially when we are dealing with events taking place in other countries – or with complex European politics. That’s why fact checks are an integral part of the European Newsroom. In these fact checks, experienced researchers and journalists provide orientation in the confusing universe of public statements.

Biden gun reform speech manipulated to add derogatory heckling

Biden gun reform speech manipulated to add derogatory heckling

A video viewed nearly 200,000 times on Instagram appears to show a crowd interrupting US President Joe Biden with an expletive-laden chant during a speech on gun reform. But the clip has been manipulated; the original footage of the address shows Biden reacting as the father of a school shooting victim stood up to call for a greater response to gun violence.

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Posts link Covid-19 vaccines to ‘turbo-cancers’ without evidence

Posts link Covid-19 vaccines to ‘turbo-cancers’ without evidence

Social media posts claim Covid-19 vaccines have caused a surge in aggressive forms of cancer. This is unproven; experts say available data do not show an increased risk — and health authorities recommend the shots for cancer patients, whose treatments can leave them immunocompromised and more vulnerable to the coronavirus.

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False posts misrepresenting German study claim gargling with salt water kills coronavirus

False posts misrepresenting German study claim gargling with salt water kills coronavirus

Multiple social media posts falsely claim German researchers have confirmed gargling with salt water kills the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. But AFP found no such study. A scientist who led a similar study in 2020 — which found certain commercial mouthwashes could reduce the risk of virus transmission — said mouthwashes are ineffective in treating Covid-19. There is no scientific evidence that salt water gargling can prevent or treat Covid-19, according to health experts.

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